Archives For Apologetics

August 13, 2015

Q & Eh?

by Lyndon Unger

Welcome to our weekly Q & A.  This is the part of the show where we dig into the mailbag and answer questions from our viewers at home.

No wait.

I’m thinking of my local cable access crochet show: Hook, Line, and Thinker.  It’s my show where I discuss various theological issues while crocheting interesting toques.

Bane Mask

THIS is the Cripplegate, so it’s our first ever (and possibly last, depending on how this goes) “Q & Eh?”

This is where readers ask the Canadian contributor questions (via FaceBook) and he answers them.  The following four questions were selected based on the number of positive votes they received.  Seeing that I forgot to limit the contest to one question per person, I’ll tackle the four winners.  Also, knowing that many people were hoping for a silly answer to these (mostly) silly questions, I’ll provide a silly answer first and then a more serious answer after that.  Let’s get started. Continue Reading…

Inerrancy_Summit_Faculty_SeminarsI published this yesterday over at Preachers & Preaching. I’m re-posting it here for any Cripplegate readers who may not have seen it there.

Last week, MP3 audio of the TMS faculty breakout sessions from the 2015 Summit on Biblical Inerrancy was put on the The Master’s Seminary media page.

These seminar sessions were in addition to the main sessions, which can be found at this link.

The seminars are listed below in alphabetical order of the speaker.

William D. BarrickTough Texts and Problem Passages: Evaluating Alleged Contradictions on the Pages of Scripture

Nathan BusenitzThe Ground and Pillar of the Faith: The Pre-Reformation Witness to the Doctrine of Sola Scriptura 

Abner ChouWhere Old Meets New: Inerrancy in Light of the New Testament Writers’ Use of the Old Testament 

Austin DuncanWhat’s Missing from Your Church Service? Recovering One of the Most Neglected Components of Public Worship

F. David FarnellThe Danger Within: What Happens When Evangelicals Redefine Inerrancy 

Michael GrisantiUnearthing the Truth: How Modern Archaeology Affirms the Bible 

Brad KlassenHas God Really Said? Divine Clarity and the Doctrine of Inspiration 

Steven J. LawsonGod’s Fugitive: The Daring Mission of William Tyndale

Richard MayhueThe Final Word: The Inseparable Link between Inerrancy and Biblical Authority

Michael J. VlachLetting the Lion Out of Its Cage: The Primacy of Scripture in Presuppositional Apologetics

Matt WaymeyerMen Moved by God: Dual Authorship and the Doctrine of Inerrancy

contortedI once tried to visit Canada without lying. As a South African citizen I needed a visitor’s visa to set foot on their delightful tundra. I was vacationing in Michigan with a friend who suggested it would be very jet-set of me to add Canada to my menagerie of passport stamps since the border was only a few clicks away.

The plan was to pop into the nearest coffee shop that wasn’t a Starbucks, and pose for a picture with a moose or maple leaf or a live Canuck or something equally exotic.

The visa conundrum only occurred to us en route, but my friend assured me that they seldom ask for passports, and if I sat quietly they probably wouldn’t ask me anything at all.

I rehearsed looking unsuspicious and American. As we pulled up to the border the guard cheerfully asked “Are you both Americans?” We paused as we considered any way to answer this truthfully without letting on that we were not both Americans. The pause became the answer.

Continue Reading…

“Knock, knock.”knocking

-“Who’s there?”

“The Nazis.”

-“The Nazis wh—” [SLAP]

“Vee vill ask de questions!”

Many a debate about ethical systems gets illustrated by the Corrie Ten Boom conundrum posed as Nazis knocking on your door to enquire whether you are hiding innocent Jews in your home. You can either tell the truth and sacrifice the lives of your refugees, or you can lie and, assuming you have the world’s most gullible Nazi at your door, spare the lives of those you have committed to protect.

This scenario captures a classic question of which sin is the greater, and it presumes that there is no other option.

There are three main ethical systems by which people try to attack the problem…

1. Graded Ethics – Shades of grey

This is the most common layman’s ethic. It holds that life is not black and white, but includes shades of grey between right and wrong. You can identify graded ethics easily from catchphrases like “lesser of two evils” or “necessary evil” and “greater good” or “white lie.”

Employing graded ethics, you don’t ask yourself “Is telling the truth right or wrong?”— but rather “Is telling the truth better or worse than selling out innocent lives?”

Continue Reading…

L9057fe81adc950d59ad8bf71dd3b3364ast week we featured an article entitled, Why I Am Not A Mormon. Some of our readers requested a similar article on Jehovah’s Witnesses. Today’s article is in response to that.

If you were to ask me why I am not a Jehovah’s Witness, though there are many reasons, these would be the top three:

Continue Reading…

February 4, 2015

Why I’m Not A Mormon

by Eric Davis

TempleLiving where I do, the topic of the Mormon faith often arises. It’s a religion which is gathering quite a few adherents, especially outside the USA. But if you were to ask me why I do not ascribe to Mormonism, I would begin by giving these three reasons:

Continue Reading…

Fulfilled prophecy is one of the strongest evidences for the truthfulness of the Bible and the authenticity of Jesus Christ.

Numerous Old Testament predictions were fulfilled perfectly in Christ. As the apostle Peter preached: “To Him all the prophets bear witness, that everyone who believes in Him receives forgiveness of sins through His name” (Acts 10:43).

Our Lord Himself, on the road to Emmaus, demonstrated how the Old Testament pointed to Him as the Messiah. “And beginning with Moses and all the Prophets, He interpreted to them in all the Scriptures the things concerning Himself” (Luke 24:27). Jesus’ life, which culminated in His death, burial, and resurrection, was the perfect fulfillment of God’s prior revelation (Matt. 5:17); everything took place “according to the Scriptures” (1 Cor. 15:3–4).

Though the evidence is overwhelming, unbelieving critics and skeptics raise objections nonetheless. In their unwillingness to embrace the truth, they propose alleged “problems” with biblical prophecy. But how are Christians to answer those kind of critical attacks?

In this post, I’d like to briefly respond to five common objections to biblical prophecy: Continue Reading…

Pop quiz: How many days was Jesus in the tomb?watchmaking

a) One and a half

b) Two

c) Three or

d) This is a trick question so I will first read the article and then decide.

Your average “Who Wants to Be a Millionaire” contestant would pick “three days final answer” without blinking. Everyone knows Jesus rose on the third day. But that’s not the question. How many days was he actually in the grave? The answer is one and a half days. Or three, depending on if you are a modern Swiss watchmaker or a 1st century Jewish gospel writer.

Put on your Swiss horologist cap for a moment: Jesus died on Good Friday at about 3pm (see Luke 23:44, which calls the time of death at the ninth hour after sunrise). Joseph of Arimathea lays him in the tomb before sundown, and the women interrupt their plans to embalm the body because the Sabbath begins at dusk on Friday. These ladies arrive at the empty tomb at the crack of dawn on Easter Sunday. So that makes for about thirty-six hours or so that Jesus was in the tomb.

An echt Swiss engineer would balk at guesstimating, but if you and I were to round “thirty-six or so hours” off to how many days, we’d probably settle for “a day and a half” or at most “two days.” Right?

Now, let’s say our watchmaker has his quiet time in Matthew 12 before bedtime. He wouldn’t have a good night’s rest after reading Jesus predict, “For just as Jonah was three days and three nights in the belly of the great fish, so will the Son of Man be three days and three nights in the heart of the earth”(Matt 12:40).

Let’s just fess up: Jesus was not in the tomb three days and three nights. So what gives?

Continue Reading…

Baucham PreachingBack in 2012, Voddie Baucham, Pastor of Grace Family Baptist Church in Spring, Texas, wrote an excellent article in reply to the oft-repeated claim that homosexual “marriage” is an issue of civil rights, akin to the plight of African-Americans in the 1960s. Responding to a popular article written in 2008, Baucham titled his article, “Gay is Not the New Black.” If you haven’t read that article, or if you don’t quite know how to respond to the accusation that your failure to enthusiastically celebrate homosexuality is the same as being a racist, be sure to read it today.

This week, Grace Family Baptist Church hosted their Semper Reformanda conference, addressing the topic, “Civil Authority and Christian Responsibility: Religion & Politics.” Pastor Voddie delivered a pair of addresses on the subject of homosexuality and how Christians should be thinking about the issue. I found both of the talks enlightening, well-researched, and instructive. These seminars are very capable tools for equipping God’s people to be salt and light in our world, faithfully representing God’s Word on this issue to a culture that wants nothing to do with truth.

Pastor Voddie takes on all the common questions and sound-byte arguments that homosexual activists are fond of leveling against the biblical position, including some questions which we’ve answered here on The Cripplegate (e.g., Why do you even care?, You’re just picking and choosing which Bible commands to follow!, But love is love!, and Jesus didn’t even address homosexuality!). Baucham answers these and other arguments ably and faithfully, modeling for God’s people how we can respond to these questions as well. The videos are worth the two hours they’ll take to listen to. I trust you’ll be benefited by listening.

Gay is Not the New Black

Beyond the Rhetoric: Applying Biblical Truth to the Homosexual Debate

I came across this video from Acts 17 Apologetics this week, and found it to be a potentially helpful tool as I interact with my Muslim friends for the sake of the Gospel.

 

What do you think? Is this an effective video? Will it help you in your evangelistic conversations with Muslims? What else have you found helpful in your efforts to speak the Gospel to Muslims?