Archives For Jesse Johnson

All true Christians understand how the cross has an effect in the past—because of it, we have our sins forgiven; and in the future—because of the cross we will go to heaven when we die. In other words, the cross directly affects our justification and our glorification. But what about the present? How does the cross affect our sanctification?

Time out. Stop. When you read that question (“how does the cross affect our sanctification?”), did you think I meant “how does the gospel affect our sanctification?” I didn’t. I meant the cross. The wooden cross on which Jesus was crucified. The actual death of Jesus. How does the death of Jesus affect our sanctification?  Continue Reading…

Yesterday  I argued that mercy ministry that is done through the local church is not only biblical, but it is more effective than other alternatives.

For starters, every biblical instance of mercy ministry from the ascension forward is in the context of the local church. In the case of famine, food is collected by the church, for the “saints in Jerusalem” (Rom 15:25-31).  In the case of widows, support is collected by the elders, managed by the deacons, given to only those who are devoted to prayer and serving in their church (Acts 4:37, 6:1; 1 Tim 5:5-10).   Continue Reading…

If the World Vision marriage controversy a few weeks ago (more about that here and here) teaches us anything, it is this: there has to be a better way for Christians to be involved in mercy ministry. If we are content giving money away to organizations that pride themselves on being atheolgoical, then we are going to continually be frustrated when our resources end up being used to advance an agenda that is less than biblical.

I have a few ideas about how to do mercy ministry more effectively, but first a quick comment about the stunning hypocrisy that came out as a result of World Vision’s capitulation (and recapitulation) on gay marriage:   Continue Reading…

The Noah movie was released, and by all accounts (or by all discerning accounts) was a complete mash-up of gnosticism, mysticism, kabbalah, with an unhealthy dash of environmentalism. It has certainly brought out the worst in the quasi-evangelical community, who produced all sorts of reviews showing their earnestness to engage with popular culture (“it may have promoted devil worship, but the CGI was awesome!!!), whereas others seemed to try really hard to justify all those buses they rented to take their congregations to Christian screenings.

Anyway, Trevin Wax helpfully put many of the best (and worst) reviews in one place. Some of the highlights:

This review shows how the movie is essentially warmed up gnosticism.  Al Mohler’s makes the same point. If you might actually want to see the movie, then Denny Burk gives you a review without spoilers. Meanwhile, Ken Ham does what Ken Ham does.

Today on Cripplegate, Tom Patton (a pastor at Grace Church in Los Angeles, and also a literal acting coach!) gives his meticulous review as well.

As for me, I strongly recommend you read Lyndon’s review. If you don’t know why people care about this movie, then read Lyndon’s review. If you think the movie was fun to watch, then read Lyndon’s review. If you are sick and tired of reading people who say things like “blah blah, at least it will help you talk about God more, blah blah” then read Lyndon’s review. Lyndon does not mix words, tells you all you need to know about the movie, and writes exceptionally well. Plus you will get a picture of Eddie VanHalen eating a McMuffin. If it doesn’t instantly become one of your favorite movie reviews, then let me know, and I will gladly refund your money.

Last weeks gay-marriage flop-flip with World Vision did not come out of left field. (Monday they announced that a monogamous homosexual relationship was in-step with Christian faithfulness, and on Wednesday they said ‘ummm…nevermind; sorry about that’).  But this was a schisim that was a long time coming, and illustrates a profound danger inherent in mercy ministries that are not built upon a theological foundation.

Continue Reading…

Have you ever wondered why religious bookstores, Christian schools, and other religious organizations are allowed to discriminate based on religion in their hiring? Why is it legal for a radio station, or a charity, or a halal butcher to only employ those of like faith? The answer goes back to a legal right enshrined by World Vision, and a right that World Vision last week considered leveraging to advance the same-sex agenda in the United States.

Continue Reading…